Mapping NIST CSF Controls: How to Get Started

Mapping NIST CSF Controls: How to Get Started

Control mapping is the process of bringing together two or more compliance domains or sets of business requirements to build a strategy that aligns to your unique needs. While the NIST CSF controls set the standards for information security, which controls you apply and how you apply them depends on your unique business environment. Important factors to consider are your appetite for risk, the ...

A Guide to NIST CSF Controls

A Guide to NIST CSF Controls

The NIST Cybersecurity Framework is a globally recognized set of best security practices and guidelines. Although compliance is voluntary, and the framework provides much flexibility over how organizations implement the various controls it encompasses, it is heavily tied to the NIST Special Publication 800 53.

Understanding the Purpose of NIST CSF Controls

Understanding the Purpose of NIST CSF Controls

The NIST Cybersecurity Framework was first released in 2014 with the purpose of promoting better risk management and innovation across the critical infrastructure sector in the US. Since then, it has been widely adopted around the world across a multitude of industries, including defense, healthcare, and legal.

What are the NIST Framework Core Functions?

What are the NIST Framework Core Functions?

The NIST Cybersecurity Framework seeks to better align business risk management with the rising demands of information security. To that end, it serves as the foundation for any robust cybersecurity strategy, and it is the basis of many industry-specific compliance regimes, such as HIPAA and CMMC.

Why NIST CSF Maturity is Important for All Organizations

Why NIST CSF Maturity is Important for All Organizations

Given the rapidly evolving nature of the cyberthreat landscape, a cybersecurity program needs to be similarly dynamic and adaptable. An effective program continuously improves to tackle the latest threats and remain relevant.

NIST CSF FAQs: Is It Right Option for Your Organization?

NIST CSF FAQs: Is It Right Option for Your Organization?

Every business in existence has valuable and sensitive data at its disposal, and protecting it from the myriad threats out there has become a top priority. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework is thus top of mind for many organizations.

Why Following NIST CSF Requirements is More Important Than Ever

Why Following NIST CSF Requirements is More Important Than Ever

Far too many business leaders still consider the needs of information security to be a burden, and a costly and time-consuming one at that. But as the threat landscape continues to evolve alongside technological advancement, the need for achieving the highest possible standards of cybersecurity is clearer than ever. It’s not just about protecting information systems either. It’s also about adding ...

Why is the NIST Cybersecurity Framework Important?

Why is the NIST Cybersecurity Framework Important?

Organizations of all types and sizes face unrelenting threats from malicious actors, including organized cybercrime, corporate espionage, and state-sponsored attackers. Every business owes it to themselves, their stakeholders, and their customers to take a proactive stance to IT security and risk-management, which is why the NIST Cybersecurity Framework has been adopted globally as the gold ...

3 Ways Dark Web Monitoring Helps Ensure a Successful CMMC Assessment

3 Ways Dark Web Monitoring Helps Ensure a Successful CMMC Assessment

While the cybersecurity maturity model certification (CMMC) framework makes no mention of the dark web, it is essential that security leaders understand the risk it presents.

CMMC Certification: Why Managed Detection and Response is Critical

CMMC Certification: Why Managed Detection and Response is Critical

The cybersecurity maturity model certification (CMMC) requires a multilayered approach to information security. Of the 171 practices listed in the CMMC cybersecurity framework, 16 fall into the domain of identification and authentication (IA), which deals with user credentials like usernames and passwords.